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Re:Purposed

Matthew McLendon

ISBN: 978 1 85759 937 4
Size: 222 x 222 mm / 8¾ x 8¾ in.
Binding: Paperback
Pages: 128
Images: 66

UK £25.00 / US $35.00

HIGHLIGHTS

•    Accompanies a major exhibition at the Ringling Museum of Art, Florida, from 13 February to 17 May 2015
•    Features well-known soundsuits by Nick Cave and sculptures by El Anatsui, as well as installations from Jill Sigman, the dumpster project by Mac Premo, ethereal sculpture by Aurora Robson, and high fashion textiles woven from cassette tape by Alyce Santoro.

DESCRIPTION

This fascinating, fully illustrated book explores several recognisable trends among artists who consistently ‘re-purpose’ garbage or detritus to create works that examine identity and environment. Each theme is a potent reminder of our close connection to the materials we use to create and facilitate our lives. In the deft hands of these artists, those connections are far from severed when these materials are discarded. The book illustrates well-known sound suits by Nick Cave and sculptures by El Anatsui, as well as installations from Jill Sigman, the dumpster project by Mac Premo, ethereal sculpture by Aurora Robson and high fashion textiles woven from cassette tape by Alyce Santoro. 

Featuring interviews with the artists, this cleverly designed volume highlights both recognisable and unpublished works of art from established and emerging artists in the field. 

  

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matthew McLendon is the Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art at the Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Florida.

REVIEWS

" 'Re:Purposed' has the work of just 10 artists but they cut a wide swath through the genre… McLendon doesn't shoehorn the artists into categories, instead suggesting porous borders with shared associations. If you choose not to delve into the conceptual aspects, not to worry. The show has enough visual excitement to delight and engage even young children… It's meant to inspire and aspire. To find beauty where we never thought to look."
Tampa Bay Times

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